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Tamil Nadu---> Big Hike in cash component for gallantry award winners

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From THE HINDU. 18 Sep 2011, Page 9. 

Big Hike in cash component for gallantry award winners.

The State ( Tamil Nadu ) Govt has increased manifold, the quantum of cash awards for recipients of gallantry awards, as follows :---

Award                          Present Amount                        New Amount.
                                           ( Rs )                                     ( Rs )

PVC                                  22,500                                   15 Lakhs.

MVC                                 15,000                                    10 Lakhs.

Vr C                                   7,000                                      7.5 Lakhs

Ashok Chakra                   20,000                                     12 Lakhs.

Kirti Chakra                       12,000                                      8 Lakhs.

Shaurya Chakra                  5,000                                       5 Lakhs.

More Benefits for ESM working in T N Ex-Servicemen Corporation ( TEXCO )

The Tamil Nadu Govt has also announced the following benefits for the 8,500 ESM, employed by TEXCO :--
a ) Insurance cover upto Three Lakhs, under Personal Accident scheme.
b ) Rs 1.78 crore will be invested annually under the Group Superannuation Scheme. 

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Rehabilitating retiring soldiers Use them to combat Maoists

, by indianmilitaryveterans

Wednesday, September 21, 2011, Chandigarh, India

Tribuneby Lt-Gen Harwant Singh (retd)
MORE than 80 per cent soldiers retire at the age of 36 or 37 years and their annual number is almost 50,000. They do not even reach the midway point of their pay band, miss out on increments, get pension based on the point in the pay band they are retired, missing out 24/23 years of higher pay if they, like all civilian government employees, had to serve up to the age of 60 years.
Consequently, they suffer multiple disadvantages. Retired too early and given inadequate pension, they, in addition, lose out on the largesse of at least two subsequent Central Pay Commissions. After taking the best years of a soldier’s life, we throw him out to fend for himself in the harsh realities of life: to find a job in mid-life.
The Defence Minister has finally realised that ex-servicemen do need a second career. According to him, they could be accommodated in Central Police Organisations (CPOs — now called CAPFS), government jobs, etc, and that he will also write to the states to employ ex-servicemen. Surely, he should know that instructions to the states and the CPOs already exist to that end, but are not implemented. Simply because implementation of orders/instructions, enforcement of laws, timely completion of projects, etc, are extremely poor in this country. Above all, there is so much money to be made in fresh recruitment!
This trained manpower, instead of being taken as a national asset, is simply being wasted, resulting in an ever-increasing number of disillusioned veterans. The government must work out a comprehensive scheme to absorb this trained and disciplined manpower into gainful employment. Some percentage must be taken into government jobs, the CAPFS, the railways, the state police, the forest departments and so on. Some others can be given technical training so that they can run their own little establishments or join the industrial force. These schemes will be implemented only when an Act of Parliament to this end is passed.
CAPFS units presently deployed against the Maoists and those special state police units created to deal with the Maoists, no matter how fanciful a name one may give them, (Grey Hounds, Cobras, etc) have simply not been able to measure up to the job. Reinforcing these units, presently fighting the Maoists, with retiring soldiers will not do. The latter will soon acquire habits and work culture prevalent in these units.
The deficiency with these units is of leadership, which has failed to train their men and are unwilling to lead and share the risks faced by their constables, etc. Thus, policemen of all hues, ill trained as they appear to be, are being routinely killed in large numbers while their officers do not figure even among the wounded! How come in every “fire-fight,” Maoists are always successful in carrying away their dead! There is the other issue of morale of this constabulary. At the last Independence Day function policemen were given around 900 gallantry awards. This is an unusually high number. According to Sun Tzu, the great Chinese soldier and scholar, indiscriminate grant of gallantry awards to a force is a sure sign of low morale. There is complete failure to infiltrate these groups with intelligence organisations’ own operators (moles). Consequently, the police is being perpetually surprised.
Raising more CAPFS and state police units in any form will not do, as these have simply not been able to meet the Maoist challenge. Moreover, these units will be on the country’s pay rolls for the next 40 years and on the pension list for another 15 to 20 years: long after the Maoist problem would have disappeared. Therefore, raising of such units should be stopped and instead financial resources earmarked for these be deployed for the betterment of people in the Maoist-affected areas. The practice of outsourcing an anti-Maoist operation to SPOs and Salwa Judum groups must be ended. Such groups tend to become law unto themselves, settle personal scores, indulge in contract killings, kidnapping, etc, as it happened in Punjab during the eighties and the early nineties. Such vigilante groups are no solution for combating insurgencies.
Based on the indications from the Ministry of Home Affairs, the military is reported to be working on raising two Corps with Rashtriya Rifles (RR) units. RR battalions have been formed by milking regular units. This has resulted in serious deficiencies in the regular units, particularly of officers. This shortage is impacting training, administration and operational fitness of these units. Raising more RR units will aggravate this problem. It amounts to dealing with one problem and creating another far more serious. Further, the situation in Jammu and Kashmir does not appear to be stable enough to pull out RR battalions from there. In case these are raised as an additional manpower, the problem would be the same as in the case of raising more police units.
A better and cheaper option is to raise military units from the retiring soldiers, who are already trained. These units should be headed by Short Service Commission and other officers who retire early. It may be advisable to take some retired and yet young brigadiers and maj-generals who have a vast experience of counter-insurgency operations. This should be taken as their second career, spanning five (for officers) to 10 years (soldiers), with pay and gratuity in addition to the emoluments earned earlier. For cohesiveness and integration of personnel into well-organised units, it would be preferable to form them out of their original groupings — Dogras, Jats, Kumaon, the Artillery Regiment, etc.
Where possible, officers for these units too should be from the same groups. Brigade and divisional headquarters as well as corps headquarters can be formed mostly from the pool of retired officers and others. This force should be mandated to operate across state boundaries and work in consonance and in coordination with the CAPFS, state police forces, intelligence agencies and state governments. Such an arrangement will prove an effective instrument to completely eliminate the Maoist problem in a span of five to 10 years, which otherwise has all the portents of spreading. While these new units and formations are given six months to organise, integrate and train at the regimental centres, minimum essential temporary accommodation must be there in various locations where these units and formations are to be housed. Once such a proposal is accepted, the other details can be worked out.
The eventual remedy for the Maoist problem lies in undertaking developmental work in the affected districts. Therefore, anti-Maoist operations and developmental work must go apace; these should be well coordinated and be complementary to each other. While we go hammer and tongs after the Maoists, every step must be taken to avoid collateral damage and mishandling of innocents and those caught up in the vortex of Maoists violence. Operations should be coordinated by all agencies.
The Maoist problem needs urgent attention. Though the Prime Minister considers it as the most serious threat to internal security, there is much delay and procrastination in the proper tackling of this menace. Left inadequately addressed, it will spread, with grave consequences for the country’s stability and progress.n
The writer is a former Deputy Chief of Army Staff.
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President Obama addresses the United Nations General Assembly. LIVE VIDEO

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Spend Rs 32 a day? Govt says you can't be poor

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NEW DELHI: The Planning Commission told the Supreme Court on Tuesday that anyone spending more than Rs 965 per month in urban India and Rs 781 in rural India will be deemed not to be poor. Updating the poverty line cut-off figures, the commission said those spending in excess of Rs 32 a day in urban areas or Rs 26 a day in villages will no longer be eligible to draw benefits of central and state government welfare schemes meant for those living below the poverty line.

According to the new criterion suggested by the planners, if a family of four in Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore or Chennai is spending anything more than Rs 3,860 per month on its members, it would not be considered poor. It's a definition that many would find ridiculously unrealistic. Not surprisingly, the new above the poverty line definition has already created outrage among activists, who feel it is just a ploy to artificially depress the number of poor in India. The plan panel said these were provisional figures based on the Tendulkar committee report updated for current prices by taking account of the Consumer Price Index for industrial and agricultural workers.

TOI broke down the overall monthly figure for urban areas and used the CPI for industrial workers along with the Tendulkar report figures to see what these numbers translate into and how much the Planning Commission believes is enough to spend on essential items so as not to be deemed poor.

The Planning Commission suggests that spending Rs 5.5 on cereals per day is good enough to keep people healthy. Similarly, a daily spend of Rs 1.02 on pulses, Rs 2.33 on milk and Rs 1.55 on edible oil should be enough to provide adequate nutrition and keep people above the poverty line without the need of subsidized rations from the government. It further suggests that just Rs 1.95 on vegetables a day would be adequate. A bit more, and one might end up outside the social security net.

People should be spending less than 44 paise on fruits, 70 paise on sugar, 78 paise on salt and spices and another Rs 1.51 on other foods per day to qualify for the BPL list and for subsidy under various government schemes. A person using more than Rs 3.75 per day on fuel to run the kitchen is doing well as per these figures. Forget about the fuel price hike and sky-rocketing rents, if anyone living in the city is spending over Rs 49.10 a month on rent and conveyance, he or she could miss out on the BPL tag.

As for healthcare, according to the Planning Commission, Rs 39.70 per month is sufficient to stay healthy. On education, the plan panel feels those spending 99 paise a day or Rs 29.60 a month in cities are doing well enough not to need any help. Similarly, one could be considered not poor if he or she spends more than Rs 61.30 a month on clothing, Rs 9.6 on footwear and another Rs 28.80 on other personal items.

The monthly cut-off given by the Planning Commission before the apex court was broken down using the Consumer Price Index of Industrial Workers for 2010-11 and the breakdown given in Annexure E of the Tendulkar report of expenditure calculated at 2004-05 prices.

The new tentative BPL criteria was worked out by the Planning Commission and approved by the Prime Minister's office before the government's affidavit was submitted before the Supreme Court. The plan panel said the final poverty line criteria would be available after the completion of the NSSO survey of 2011-12.

The Montek Singh Ahluwalia-headed Planning Commission had drawn flak from the apex court which, on May 14, took exception to the poverty line definition which initially said anyone spending more than Rs 20 in urban areas and Rs 15 in rural areas should not be considered poor. "The Planning Commission may revise the norms of per capita amount looking to the price index of May 2011 or any other subsequent dates," the court had said. So, the planners have now given a revised figure of Rs 32 for urban areas and Rs 26 for poor areas.

In their affidavit, the planners have defended their definition of the poverty line and not revised the norms, but merely updated them with the CPI for the current year. The affidavit says, "The recommended poverty lines ensure the adequacy of actual private expenditure per capita near the poverty lines on food, education and health and the actual calories consumed are close to the revised calorie intake norm for urban areas and higher than the norm in rural areas."

Spend Rs 32 a day Govt says you cant be poor

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352 Indians, 18 Afghans pass out of OTA

, by indianmilitaryveterans


352 Indians, 18 Afghans pass out of OTA
For cadets from Afghanistan it was the psychological training that amazed them the most at the Officers Training Academy (OTA) in Chennai, while Indian cadets found the physical part demanding.

“Physical training was easy for us. We came mainly to develop our mental strength and learn the functioning of Indian Army,” said Mohammad Sanjer (21) of Kabul, on Saturday after he and 17 other Afghans passed out of the academy with 352 Indians after a 11-month course.

The Indian experience has taught Sanjer, who has served in the Afghan Army for 18 months, to be strong psychologically.

After reviewing the passing out parade, Lt Gen Vijay Ahluwalia, the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Central Command said Indian Army was open to changes as the requirements of the future battlefield would be different.
352-indians and18-afghans pass-out OTA

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Third gen Army woman happy

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Geneva Lalji helped by proud parents for the ceremony — DC
Geneva Lalji helped by proud parents for the ceremony — DC
It was a proud moment for the Lalji family as a member of the third generation was commissioned into the army.
Major General (retd.) Lalji was esctatic that his granddaughter Ganeve Lalji had kept the family tradition alive by joining the army after completing 11 months of training at the Officers Training Academy in Chennai.
Ganeve’s father, Colonel S.S. Lalji is not ony proud of his daughter but also confident that members of the family’s fourth generation would also be commissioned into the army.
“It is a proud moment today and it can’t get any better. But I will surely wait for the day my daughter’s child also gets commissioned into army,” said Colonel Lalji. The grandfather could not control his emotions. “I will be alive to see that happen,” he said.
Ganeve, a post graduate in English, will join the intelligence wing of the army. Her father and grandfather were both commissioned into the engineering wing.
Colonel Lalji said the family was attached to the defence forces as “the profession gives the most secular feeling and we are proud to call ourselves the first countrymen of the soil.”
Third-gen army woman happy

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Army welfare Housing Organisation - Chennai Project

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Army welfare Housing Organisation


All Veterans are offered such houses built as a welfare measure.
Who are interested ao apply..... Please visit

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